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Saturday, 25 January 2020

What Is Wrong In These Pictures? (7-9)

Yet another three pictures from my dad’s 1927 edition of Arthur Mee’s Children’s Encyclopedia. Each contains an error to identify. I’ve managed to get three out of six right so far, which could be worse, but could be better. One follower has got them all! My answers and the answers are underneath.


Back to pictures 4-6
Forward to pictures 10-12 


MY ANSWERS AND THE ANSWERS

7. We’re on a winner. Surely the Pole Star should be over the North Pole. Hooray! 4/7.

8. The smoke is blowing one way but the yacht’s sails and flag are blowing the other. 5/8. We’re on a roll.

9. What’s wrong with the penny? This is really esoteric. I’m certain that Britannia is facing the right way so I suspect it is may be to do with the ship and lighthouse. I bet that they don’t accord with the date. It’s a guess but I’m right. Evidently the ship and lighthouse were omitted after 1896. Well, shiver my timbers! Should I get that? I think so. 6/9.

So with a bit of leniency I’m up to 67% right, a good 2:1 in university scoring. But these are probably easier than the first six so best not get carried away. More next time.


24 comments:

  1. You're about to be offered a job in MI6.

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    1. No me. Rachel. She's got 9/9 so far. I've been wondering whether you had seen the sun dial Picture 5 and amaze us with your knowledge of gnomons.

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    2. Well, this is a guess, but I have set a few sundials before so noticed that it is set at due North...

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    3. No idea about the penny or the ship, though.

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    4. I guessed you'd know about sundials. As Rachel so brilliantly pointed out (Picture 5 previous page) it must be a southern hemisphere sundial.

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  2. If I'm very generous and not too nit-picky I get 3 too.

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  3. Phew! I managed 3 too, but the penny was just a guess.

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    1. I guessed that too. Anyone who could actually describe and dat the 1896/97 change deserves a bonus point.

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  4. We had the question about the penny in our TV quiz book in 1961, so got that. The ship one was easy and the North Pole and the Pole Star. SO I got them.

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    1. If you actually knew the lighthouse and ship were removed after 1896 then as ultimate judge (in the understandable absence of Arthur Mee) I award you a bonus point.

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    2. yes, it was always a trick question in quiz books in the 50s and 60s.

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  5. I got the wind one right away! Woo hoo!

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    1. Is "woo hoo" the sound the wind makes blowing across the Canadian prairies?

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  6. I got the first two easily but unfortunately I am not familiar with British money, old or new, so I missed that one. These are fun and if you don't know the answer you learn something new.

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    1. It's old pounds shillings and pence so not many British people under 55 or 60 would be familiar with old pennies - we changed to decimal in 1971. The reason we had the old system, along with ounces, pounds, stones, hundredweights and tons, and even stranger measures, was to confuse people from abroad, especially Europeans.

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  7. The penny was out of my depth. Husband knew the pole 🌟 answer straight away & we both answered #8 correctly.

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    1. 2/3 then. See response to previous commment. You have to be a certain age to remember the old currency and probably a coin collector or interested in puzzles to know the anser to that part of the question.

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  8. Same as Bonnie, I found the first two easy-peasy but did not really stand a chance with the last one, as I am not familiar enough with English money.

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    1. There are those who think we should bring back pounds, shillings and pence after Brexit!

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  9. It's not "Shiver my timbers!" me 'earty, it's "Shiver me timbers!" like a real pirate. Oh arr!

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    1. Only on September 19th each year - "international talk like a pirate day". For a proper lesson see my post http://www.taskerdunham.blogspot.com/2014/11/talk-like-pirate.html

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  10. But if the illustrator had actually put the Pole star over the North pole, it wouldn't have been possible to see it. Weren't you supposed to work that out for yourself?

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    Replies
    1. Too clever for me! Either that or you're making it too complicated.

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